69
      Monday
      85 / 61
      Tuesday
      87 / 63
      Wednesday
      84 / 63

      Keeping safe when lightning strikes

      No one really ventures outside thinking they'll be hit by lightning, but lightning storms have the tendency to strike without warning.

      And that's what makes them so dangerous.

      "Lightning is a pretty big threat, because we can't tell people ahead of time that lightning's about to strike their backyard or about to strike their particular location." said National Weather Service meteorologist Matt Zika.

      There have been no less than 17 lightning-related fatalities this year alone. At least one of them happened in Michigan.

      "There was a case earlier this week where down in the Green Bay area. There was somebody that was struck and killed by lightning and a lot of the witnesses said they heard the thunder, but they hadn't seen a whole lot of lightning prior to the lightning strike." said Zika.

      It may sound obvious, but you are most vulnerable to lightning strikes outdoors.

      Even more so in big, wide-open areas like golf courses, such as Marquette Golf and Country Club, where dependable shelters like houses or enclosed vehicles aren't always within reach.

      Course personnel are trained to act upon hearing the telltale noise of thunder.

      By the time you hear it, the lightning is already much closer.

      "We've gone through lightning classes like most golf courses, I think. And basically we were taught 'If you can hear thunder, it can hit you', so we're already looking. If we hear it, we're trying to get people off the golf course immediately" said Head Golf Pro Marc Gilmore.

      Even when you're inside, there are still some precautions you can take.

      For example, its not safe to stay near windows or to use anything connected to wires, including phones, during storms.

      And for obvious reasons, its not a good idea to take a bath or shower until you know the storm has passed.

      To learn more about lightning safety, you can visit the National Weather Service's site here.