75
      Wednesday
      86 / 63
      Thursday
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      Friday
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      Women sentenced for the neglect of 60 animals

      The two women charged with animal neglect were sentenced in Dickinson County court on Monday.

      Joan and Kathy Khoury pled no contest in October to charges regarding animal abuse and mistreatment of more than 60 animals, including 30 horses .

      Both Joan and Kathy Khoury were sentenced to 60 days in jail, but the court will suspend half their jail time in exchange for 60 days of community service.

      Judge Christopher Ninomiya told the defendants that "it is highly unusual for individuals such as yourselves with no criminal history, to be the age that you are, to come before a court and be looking at jail time," continuing "in this case I believe it is both necessary, and appropriate."

      The Khoury's also received nearly $3,000 in fines each.

      Both defendants made statements apologizing for their actions and the photo that flourished, spreading virally across the internet.

      "Sorry about the Halloween costume it was not meant to offend anyone," explained Kathy Khoury. "I am truly sorry."

      "I learned a hard lesson," said Joan Khoury. "I won't repeat this again."

      Defense Attorney Julie LaCost argued her clients have no criminal record, and suffer from mental health issues, and didn't believe they should face jail time.

      She claims her clients "were afraid to ask for help" and said they feared "this very circumstance that has arisen."

      Judge Ninomiya responded that their mental health is not a sufficient excuse and felt the two women needed a wake up call.

      "It is necessary to punish you for your actions, or to some degree, your inactions, it is necessary to deter you, as well as others in the community, from engaging in this type of behavior," ordered Judge Ninomiya.

      The two women are additionally not allowed to work with, care for, or own any animals for the duration of their two year probation. The judge added if he wasn't restricted by Michigan laws he would make that a lifetime sentence.